E Kamiano, pray for us!
Today is the Feast of St. Damien of Moloka’i, a humble priest of the Fathers of the Sacred Hearts who left his native Belgium and sailed to Hawai’i as a missionary to spread the light of the Gospel. 
In Hawai’i in the 1800s, people who contracted leprosy were forced to leave their families and shipped to the Island of Moloka’i there to die in exile.  Fr. Damien was sent to Moloka’i to serve the lepers in Moloka’i; in administering the sacraments, Fr. Damien literally brought Jesus to a leper colony.
Aided towards the end of his life by St. Marianne Cope and her Sisters, Fr. Damien himself died of leprosy on April 15, 1889.  If he died in April, why then is his feast in May?  Since the date of his birth into everlasting life and total union with Christ often falls during Lent, the Bl. John Paul II at his beatification assigned him a liturgical memorial on May 10, the anniversary of his arrival in 1873 to Moloka’i, the island of death.  Thus is has been exactly 140 years since St. Damien first step foot on the island where he would live, work, and die in the service of the Lord.
Click here for more info about St. Damien the Leper of Moloka’i.

[Image:  Icon of St. Damien from the Studio of St. John the Baptist.]

E Kamiano, pray for us!

Today is the Feast of St. Damien of Moloka’i, a humble priest of the Fathers of the Sacred Hearts who left his native Belgium and sailed to Hawai’i as a missionary to spread the light of the Gospel.
 

In Hawai’i in the 1800s, people who contracted leprosy were forced to leave their families and shipped to the Island of Moloka’i there to die in exile.  Fr. Damien was sent to Moloka’i to serve the lepers in Moloka’i; in administering the sacraments, Fr. Damien literally brought Jesus to a leper colony.


Aided towards the end of his life by St. Marianne Cope and her Sisters, Fr. Damien himself died of leprosy on April 15, 1889.  If he died in April, why then is his feast in May?  Since the date of his birth into everlasting life and total union with Christ often falls during Lent, the Bl. John Paul II at his beatification assigned him a liturgical memorial on May 10, the anniversary of his arrival in 1873 to Moloka’i, the island of death.  Thus is has been exactly 140 years since St. Damien first step foot on the island where he would live, work, and die in the service of the Lord.


Click here for more info about St. Damien the Leper of Moloka’i.

[Image:  Icon of St. Damien from the Studio of St. John the Baptist.]

Besides her story of heroic self-sacrifice, one of the most endearing moments of St. Gianna’s life that I will always remember is that when picking out fabric for her wedding dress, she told her sister, Do you know, I want to choose the most beautiful material because afterwards I would like to make a chasuble from it for the First Mass of one of my sons.

This quote reminded me of how important it is to discern God’s will in one’s life, specifically to say “yes” to His call, to the vocation in which He desires me to serve Him.  In conforming my will to His, in answering His invitation to love in the manner that He chooses, I can best glorify my God and walk the path that is most suited to lead me to heaven.  For what is at stake is not only my soul, but the souls of many others. 

In following your vocation, you are becoming the person that God has created you—from the very moment of your conception—to be.  God, however, does not make our decisions for us.  We must choose, and the choices that we make today, particularly in regards to our vocation, have have an effect on countless others. 

As a religious sister or brother, there are people dying who need your comfort, young students who need to be formed academically and spiritually, and the poor who need your help to survive.

As a contemplative nun, there are people, many hurting people, who need your prayers and sacrifices.

As a deacon, there are people in crisis, engaged couples preparing for marriage, parents who desire baptism for their newborns who need your guidance and blessing.

As a priest, there are sinners who need you to hear their confession, dying people who need you to administer last rites, and starving people who need you to give them the Bread of Life.

As a husband or wife, you have a spouse who needs your help to get to heaven, and, if it be God’s will, your love may bear fruit in children who would not have been born but for the fact that you said “yes” to your vocation.

Now, since it was the Feast of St. Gianna Beretta Molla yesterday and Good Shepherd Sunday today, I thought that it is quite apropos to post this reflection of St. Gianna on the topic of vocations.

“Everything has a specific end: everything obeys a law. God has shown each one of us the way, the vocation, and the life of grace that lies beyond physical life. Our earthly and eternal happiness depends on following our vocation without faltering. What is a vocation? It is a gift from God–it comes from God himself. Our concern then, should be to know the will of God. We should enter into the path that God wills for us, not by “forcing the door,” But when God wills as God wills….”

The vocation to marriage is somewhat unique because it depends on another person saying “yes” to his or her vocation.  So, St. Gianna was able to follow God’s call to serve Him as a wife and mother because her husband, Pietro Molla, also followed God’s will in his life.  This is most evident in his love letters to his wife, including the following one that he gave to Gianna the night before their wedding which accompanied special wedding gifts of a gold watch and pearl necklace.

“Gianna, let these crown the wonder and the brightness of your beauty and your virtues on our wedding day. May the watch always mark the loveliness and most peaceful times of our life, and may this pearl necklace be a sign of the enchanting light of our love. They are given to you, with great affection, by your mother and my mother, and by your Pietro with the greatest love.”

[Photo:  The pic of the chasuble made with fabric from St. Gianna’s wedding dress (a 2nd class relic!) is from All You Who Hope]

Stages of Ordination

Instituted Lector

Instituted Acolyte

Deacon

Priest

(See the traditional minor orders.)

[Photos:  from “The Ordination Series”  Nice Catholic modern art by Neilson Carlin]

The traditional minor orders
Tonsure
Porter
Lector
Exorcist
Acolyte
Subdeacon
Deacon
Priest

[Photo:  from Traditional Vocations Blog]

The traditional minor orders

Tonsure

Porter

Lector

Exorcist

Acolyte

Subdeacon

Deacon

Priest

[Photo:  from Traditional Vocations Blog]

A most appropriate time to re-post a great video about Confession by Fr. Donald Calloway, MIC.

bethestraw:

7LW: Fr. Avram Brown - “Woman, behold your son… behold your mother.”

“He now seeks that we have that same formative experience with the Blessed Mother nurturing us.” - Fr. Avram

Father calls us to reflect on Jesus’ desire for us to enter into relationship with his very own mother. Listen to Father explore what Jesus really meant when He gave our Lady to the Beloved Disciple, and vice versa.

Coming up: A reflection from BTS’ dear friend Lisa Aquino Emperador.

From Catholicism, here is Fr. Robert Barron on the Problem of Evil.


For the Christian faith, the only adequate resolution of this dilemma is the one affected by God Himself on the cross of Jesus Christ.  On that cross, the darkness of the human condition met the fulness of the Divine Love and found itself transfigured into life.  On that cross, God went to the limits of God-forsakeness and made death itself a place of hope.

It’s time to decide.

signum-crucis:

“The Lady told me,” said Claude, “that when we go to confession we are kneeling down not before a priest, but we’re kneeling down by the Cross of Her Son. And that when we are truly sorry for our sins, and we confess our sins, the Blood He shed flows down over us and washes us free from all sins.”____________________________________________
Photo: Confession during the St. Mary Magdalene festival in Vezelay. A UNESCO World Heritage Site, Vezelay is one of France’s most beautiful historic villages. It is known for the Basilique Sainte-Marie-Madeleine, or the Basilica of St. Mary Magdalene, an important pilgrimage site on St. James’ Way.Yves Gellie, July 2007

signum-crucis:

“The Lady told me,” said Claude, “that when we go to confession we are kneeling down not before a priest, but we’re kneeling down by the Cross of Her Son. And that when we are truly sorry for our sins, and we confess our sins, the Blood He shed flows down over us and washes us free from all sins.”
____________________________________________

Photo: Confession during the St. Mary Magdalene festival in Vezelay. A UNESCO World Heritage Site, Vezelay is one of France’s most beautiful historic villages. It is known for the Basilique Sainte-Marie-Madeleine, or the Basilica of St. Mary Magdalene, an important pilgrimage site on St. James’ Way.
Yves Gellie, July 2007

(via heartlessmuffineater)

"This whole idea of contraception, sterilization, and abortifacients as being necessary for women’s health is actually demeaning to women.  Undergirding this idea is the perception that women because of our fertility are deficient, and we need fixing."

Gloria Purvis speaks most eloquently regarding her perspective as a woman and as a Roman Catholic on contraception, the HHS Mandate, motherhood, the dignity of women, spiritual warfare, and the priesthood.  Click here to see more of this panel discussion sponsored by the Catholic Information Center and Altcatholicah.

Here’s another video by Fr. Claude “Dusty” Burns who had previously responded to the “Why I Hate Religion, But Love Jesus” video.  This time Fr. Burns (aka Fr. Pontifex from Phatmass) drops some spoken word about the HHS mandate and “accommodation”.

However, “all men created equal" would probably have been better for several reasons than "same"…but what rhymes with "equal"?  Sequel?

sermoveritas:

sersanto:

Em tua presença eu me sinto, um mendigo sentado à mesa de um rei!

Translation: In your presence I feel like a beggar seated at the table of a King!

sermoveritas:

sersanto:

Em tua presença eu me sinto, um mendigo sentado à mesa de um rei!

Translation: In your presence I feel like a beggar seated at the table of a King!

Think you might have seen Fr. Leo before?  You probably have on the Food Network where he competed against and beat (with all charity, of course) the superstar chef and former altar boy, Bobby Flay.

miniflipping:

Fr. Leo’s got more hand gestures for the HHS Mandate!

See how he responds to haters!

Be sure to reblog and Subscribe on Youtube!