Countdown to St. Joseph’s Day:  1 day!

It’s Josephmas Eve!

As part of my pilgrimage to World Youth Day in Madrid last summer, I was blessed to visit the Basilica Expiatory Temple of the Sacred Family (Sagrada Familia) in Barcelona, Spain.

It is a magnificent church, and one of the few places in the world that literally took my breath away.  I remember standing completely speechless as I gazed up at a forest of stone columns rising to the heavens like the biblical cedars of Lebanon.  I can honestly say without hyperbole that it is nearly impossible to accurately describe the experience of being in a church that is both of this world and of another world altogether.

After we had left, I remarked to one of the pilgrims in my group, “Sagrada Familia is an example of man at his best.”  What I meant was that all those who participated in raising this monumental temple to Christ and His Holy Family were truly fulfilling what they were created to do.  And should not that also be our desire?  To be, to do, to say what the Creator of the universe had made us to be, to do, to say from the very first moment of our lives in our mothers’ wombs. 

On many occasions, we do not live up to this potential.  Pride and sin lead us to act in ways that are contrary to God’s will for us.  When we act in ways that make us less than the person we ought to be, we become, in a sense, less alive.  And as St. Irenaeus famously said, “The Glory of God is man fully alive.”

An example of man fully alive, glorifying God by conforming his will to that of his Creator, being the person he was meant to be and doing great things, is the humble and faithful architect of Sagrada Familia, who may one day be a canonized saint, Servant of God Antoni Gaudí.

Besides being a visionary designer and unparalleled archetypical, Gaudí was first a man of faith, a man of prayer whose primary goal was to be holy.  Through prayer,  reflecting on Sacred Scripture, and reception of the Sacraments, Gaudí became the person he was created to be:  a man fully alive for the glory of God.  In his remarkable design of Sagrada Familia, Gaudí put into stone and glass the mysteries of the faith and made a fitting place for the Word Incarnate to be adored, worshiped, and received.

We are called to serve and glorify God in many ways.  Some are called to be teachers, attorneys, nurses, and accountants.  Some are called to be fathers, mothers, priests, and sisters.  But, what Gaudí and St. Joseph teach us is that we must be attentive to God’s voice, desire to do His will, and live in conformity to His will with great love.  As an architect who was not ashamed to incorporate his faith into his professional life, Gaudí created an earthly temple, a tangible image of the mystical body of Christ.  And because he did everything with great love, Gaudí himself—like all parents who created new life—reflected the almighty Creator who made the stars with His hands and who knows them each by name (cf. Psalm 147:4).

Antoni Gaudí also had a deep devotion to our beloved St. Joseph.  In undertaking this monumental project, this holy Servant of God knew that he would not live to see its completion.  Yet, he still was faithful in doing what he could, what he was called to do. 

From the book, Faces of Holiness II:  Modern Saints in Photos and Words by by Ann Ball, when people questioned about the amount of planning, labor, and money needed to complete this grand temple, Gaudí would reply, “Don’t worry—St. Joseph is a saint with many resources.”  And, another occasion when asked about the time that it would take to complete, again Gaudí turned with confidence to the Guardian of the Sagrada Familia, “He who asked me to do it is not in a hurry.”

Also, it is interesting to note that Sagrada Familia was first envisioned and funded by a group of Spanish Catholics called The Spiritual Association of Devotees of St. Joseph.  The cornerstone of the future basilica was placed on the Solemnity of St. Joseph in 1882.  Gaudí first constructed the crypt church which is the chapel of St. Joseph.  And the first Mass ever said in the yet unfinished temple was in that chapel on the Solemnity of St. Joseph in 1885.

St. Joseph, however, did not construct a magnificent and glorious house for the Son of God and Our Lady.  Yet, he was the man who best served God by continuously conforming his will to the divine Will; Joseph was indeed a man fully alive.

Surely, St. Joseph gave much aid and assistance to Servant of God Antoni Gaudí particularly in building the Sagrada Familia.  And, where he alive, would almost certainly been chipping at stone blocks or hoisting up buckets of mortar.  Sawing, hammering, carving, this is how St. Joseph worked and this is how he glorified God.

He also glorified God in fulfilling his vocation as spouse to the Queen of Heaven and foster-father of the King of Kings and Lord of Lords.  Thus, who else on earth loved Mary and Jesus more than Joseph?  Who then can we turn to for help in loving them more but our faithful patron?  What must our Joseph have felt to hear the Son of God call him “father”, and what unworthiness he must have felt to call him “Son”!

Recall, my previous post about the Life of Saint Joseph written by Sr. Maria Cecilia Baij, O.S.B. and our discussion about public revelation and private revelation.

Sr. Maria Cecilia writes,

After the Divine Child rendered His acts of oblation and homage [to the Father] and gave Himself into the arms of His holy Mother, Joseph went off to his work.  While engaged in his labors he suddenly found himself again in ecstasy, in virtue of his meditations upon the actions of his beloved Jesus.  Drawn by the forces of love, he longed to go and give himself the satisfaction of contemplating Him directly.  Fearing to be a nuisance to Jesus, the Saint suppressed this urge.

Whenever the Divine Child wished to console His faithful servant, however, He would lovingly invite him by means of an interior locution.  This invitation Joseph was unable to resist, and so he would hasten to go to Him, impelled as he was by the exceedingly powerful force of his love.  Usually, Joseph would also find Jesus already on His way to meet him.  The first time Jesus came to meet him, He was being led by His most beloved Mother.  Upon seeing Joseph, He called out to him:  “Father!” and then flung Himself into his arms and caressed him with His tiny hands.

The joy of hearing himself be called “father” for the first time moved Joseph to tears.  He considered himself to be wholly unworthy of it, and he made it very evident how grateful he was for the honor that the Child Jesus was giving him by doing so.  He ardently thanked the holy Child, and besought his most holy spouse also to give thanks in his behalf to God and to His Son.  This Mary gladly did for him.  She rejoiced with Joseph over the great blessing that was his, and they gave joint thanks to the Heavenly Father for the graces He had given to both of them, and especially for the dignity He had conferred upon His servant, in permitting him to be His representative on earth.

….

Joseph did not venture to address Jesus as his Son, though his paternal love made him feel most desirous of doing so.  He asked Mary if it would be proper for him to address Jesus in this manner.  Mary ascertained from Jesus that, inasmuch as He Himself deigned to call Joseph, “father,” and also assigned him to his paternal position here upon earth, He thereby granted him the privilege of calling Him, “Son.”  He furthermore declared that it was the will of the Heavenly Father that He, Jesus, should make Himself subject in this manner to Joseph, just as if He were truly his own offspring, and that consequently, Joseph should freely address Him as “Son,” and deal with Him as if he were His real father.

Joseph’s heart was jubilant as Mary transmitted these things to him, and he shed copious tears as a result of the consolations that he experienced.  At the same time, he gave thanks to God, in union with Mary.  To himself he remarked:  “I am indeed blessed in being the possessor of this delightful privilege which allows me to address the Divine Incarnate Word, the Son of the Eternal Father, as ‘my Son.’”

Finally, he exclaimed aloud:  “Oh Jesus, my Son.  Oh my Son, my Jesus!”

We know St. Joseph as a carpenter from the scriptures.  However, the original Greek word that is found in the gospels is tekton, a laborer who works with his hands.  It is this trade of tekton that our Joseph taught the Son of God, who with the Father and the Holy Spirit, created the stars in the heavens and the atoms in every grain of sand.  In the company of Jesus, to honor the Blessed Virgin, and give glory to God, this is how St. Joseph sanctified all his labors.  So, too, can he make holy our everyday, mundane tasks:  taking out the garbage, studying diligently, watering the plants, driving your sibling to school, buying groceries at the store—these can be moments for the sanctification of yourself and others; such ordinary work can be altars where you offer love.

Just think of Joseph’s workbench and his little Jesus at his side.

As soon as the Divine Youth grew up sufficiently to be able to render some assistance to Joseph, He sought of His own accord to go and help him in his work and to console him by His presence.  The happy Joseph never considered that Jesus actually wanted to humble Himself to such an extent as to perform this menial work, and when Jesus offered His willing assistance, the Saint was deeply moved and declared he would never allow it unless the Heavenly Father Himself had actually ordained it.

Turning to Jesus he exclaimed:  “Oh, Eternal Wisdom, why do You wish to humiliate Yourself to such a degree?  How can I, Your servant, consent to see You devoting Yourself to such work as this, delicate as You are, and engaged as You are in continually treating with Your Heavenly Father concerning the vital business of man’s redemption?  How could I look and see You being thus humiliated?”

The holy Youth set his mind at rest by declaring that this was the will of His Heavenly Father, and that in reality He Himself had come into the world not to be ministered unto, but rather to minister, wherefore, it was necessary that He should give an example of disdain for all ostentation and worldly esteem.  Joseph submitted to the will of the Heavenly Father and no longer made any objection.  Instead, he pondered over the joy that would be his by having his beloved Jesus with him in the workshop.  He became exceedingly consoled, and proclaimed his unbounded happiness.  Turning to Mary, he expressed to Her his regret that She would, necessarily, be deprived of the loving presence of Jesus during those periods of time in which He would now be with him.  The Mother of God, being always conformed to the divine will and with a heart brimming with love, assured him that She was happy about the consolations that would be his, and that the divine will would be accomplished.

One can well image what spiritual joy the happy Joseph must have experienced, and how filled with consolation he must have been, as he took his beloved Jesus with him.  When he started to work it seemed to him as if he was in Paradise.  Was not the Son of God Himself there beside him, seeking to be of assistance to him?  Sometimes, the Boy Jesus would hand him tools, and other times pieces of lumber, even though He was only about five or six years old, He apparently wanted to carry on like a strong, grown-up man, as was indicated by the efforts he made to lift up the heavier boards.  The Saint was deeply touched by this and tried in every way possible to limit these exertions.  Besides all this, the Divine Youth was always so obliging that He even anticipated Joseph’s needs; and He performed everything in a gracious spirit.

Day 9 of our novena.  Ite ad Ioseph (“Go to Joseph”, Genesis 41:55)

Countdown to St. Joseph’s Day:  6 days

Last week at their monthly meeting, the Young Adult Ministry of St. Catherine of Siena Parish hosted its very first St. Joseph’s Table (La Tavola di San Giuseppe also called St. Joseph’s Altar).  On a three-tiered table surmounted by a statue of St. Joseph, these Catholic young adults placed food to share (including home made focaccia—so they literally broke bread together) as well as canned goods to donate to the hungry.

As we prepare to celebrate the Solemnity of our great patron and father, let us seek to imitate his virtues.  The St. Joseph’s Table can help us do this, for around it loved ones gather to pray and share a meal; it is a reminder to model our own family after the Holy Family and, with grateful hearts for the many blessings of God, to show charity to others in need.

There is even an approved blessing for your St. Joseph’s Table, including a special provisions that a lay person can say if a priest or deacon is not available.

As part of the Rite of Blessing, the minister says,

Today we honor the memory of Saint Joseph, husband of the Virgin Mary and patron of the universal Church.  We rejoice at this table, which is a sign of God’s generous blessings and of our call to serve the poor and hungry.  We pray that through the intercession of Saint Joseph we too might join the saints at the banquet of the Lord in the heavenly kingdom.

All-provident God, the good things that grace this table remind us of your many good gifts.  Bless this food, and may the prayers of Saint Joseph, who provided bread for your Son and food for the poor, sustain us and all our brothers and sisters on our journey towards your heavenly kingdom.

We ask this through Christ our Lord.  Amen.

If you can’t have your own St. Joseph’s Table, you can go to the online Virtual St. Joseph’s Altar.  There you can place a symbolic item on the altar, submit a prayer request, view photos of more elaborate St. Joseph’s Tables, and even learn traditional recipes.

From the above website, here is a little bit more of the history and customs of the Tavola di San Giuseppe.

The St. Joseph Altar is Sicilian in origin. During a terrible famine, the people of Sicily pleaded to St. Joseph, their patron saint, for relief. St. Joseph answered their prayers, and the famine ended. In gratitude, they prepared a table with foods they had harvested. After paying homage to St. Joseph, they distributed the food to the less fortunate.

The Altar is set up in three tiers, representing the Holy Trinity. A statue of St. Joseph is placed on the top tier, usually surrounded by flowers, greenery & fruit.

No meat is prepared for the Altar. This is probably because St. Joseph’s Feast falls in the Lenten Season and also because meat was a rarity to the Sicilian peasants. Breads, cakes and cookies, baked in symbolic Christian shapes, are prepared for the Altar. Pastries in the shapes of monstrances, chalices, crosses, doves, lambs, fish, bibles, hearts, wreaths and palms adorn the tiers of the Altar. Symbols of St. Joseph - such as lilies, staffs, sandals, ladders, saws, hammers and nails - are also used. There is symbolism in many of the items on the Altar. Breadcrumbs rerpresent the sawdust of St. Joseph the Carpenter. Twelve whole fish represent the apostles. Wine is symbolic of the Miracle at Cana.

The Altar is a medium of petition and thanksgiving. Petitions of the faithful are written on pieces of paper and placed in baskets on the Altar. Photos of deceased relatives & friends may decorate the Altar as well.

Viva San Giuseppe!!!

Day 4 of our novenaIte ad Ioseph (“Go to Joseph”, Genesis 41:55)

Countdown to St. Joseph’s Day:  7 days

[St. Joseph] was chosen by the eternal Father to be the faithful foster-parent and guardian of the most precious treasures of God, his Son and his spouse. This was the task which he so faithfully carried out. For this, the Lord said to him, “Good and faithful servant, enter into the joy of your Lord.”  A comparison can be made between Joseph and the whole Church of Christ. Joseph was the specially chosen man through whom and under whom Christ entered the world fittingly and in an appropriate way. So, if the whole Church is in the debt of the Virgin Mary, since, through her, it was able to receive the Christ, surely after her, it also owes to Joseph special thanks and veneration.  For he it is who marks the closing of the old testament. In him the dignity of the prophets and patriarchs achieves its promised fulfilment. Moreover; he alone possessed in the flesh what God in his goodness promised to them over and again.  It is beyond doubt that Christ did not deny to Joseph in heaven that intimacy, respect, and high honour which he showed to him as to a father during his own human life, but rather completed and perfected it. Justifiably the words of the Lord should be applied to him, “Enter into the joy of your Lord.” Although it is the joy of eternal happiness that comes into the heart of man, the Lord prefers to say to him “enter into joy”. The mystical implication is that this joy is not just inside man, but surrounds him everywhere and absorbs him, as if he were plunged in an infinite abyss.  Therefore be mindful of us, blessed Joseph, and intercede for us with Him Whom men thought to be your Son. Win for us the favour of the most Blessed Virgin your spouse, the mother of Him Who lives and reigns with the Holy Spirit through ages unending.

- St. Bernardine of Siena
(Photo:  I took this picture at the National Shrine of St. Francis of Assisi in San Francisco, CA.  If you’re ever in the area, you should definitely stop by:  it is a sacred place of peace and prayer.  I especially encourage you to make your trip a holy pilgrimage.  Even if you live in the City, take some time to prayerfully journey to this Shrine to venerate the relics of St. Francis of Assisi, St. Clare, and St. Anthony of Padua.  Also, next to the Shrine is La Porziuncola Nuova, a replica of the original church that St. Francis himself rebuilt and where St. Clare made her vows.)
Day 3 of our novena.  Ite ad Ioseph (“Go to Joseph”, Genesis 41:55)

Countdown to St. Joseph’s Day:  7 days

[St. Joseph] was chosen by the eternal Father to be the faithful foster-parent and guardian of the most precious treasures of God, his Son and his spouse. This was the task which he so faithfully carried out. For this, the Lord said to him, “Good and faithful servant, enter into the joy of your Lord.”

A comparison can be made between Joseph and the whole Church of Christ. Joseph was the specially chosen man through whom and under whom Christ entered the world fittingly and in an appropriate way. So, if the whole Church is in the debt of the Virgin Mary, since, through her, it was able to receive the Christ, surely after her, it also owes to Joseph special thanks and veneration.

For he it is who marks the closing of the old testament. In him the dignity of the prophets and patriarchs achieves its promised fulfilment. Moreover; he alone possessed in the flesh what God in his goodness promised to them over and again.

It is beyond doubt that Christ did not deny to Joseph in heaven that intimacy, respect, and high honour which he showed to him as to a father during his own human life, but rather completed and perfected it. Justifiably the words of the Lord should be applied to him, “Enter into the joy of your Lord.” Although it is the joy of eternal happiness that comes into the heart of man, the Lord prefers to say to him “enter into joy”. The mystical implication is that this joy is not just inside man, but surrounds him everywhere and absorbs him, as if he were plunged in an infinite abyss.

Therefore be mindful of us, blessed Joseph, and intercede for us with Him Whom men thought to be your Son. Win for us the favour of the most Blessed Virgin your spouse, the mother of Him Who lives and reigns with the Holy Spirit through ages unending.

- St. Bernardine of Siena

(Photo:  I took this picture at the National Shrine of St. Francis of Assisi in San Francisco, CA.  If you’re ever in the area, you should definitely stop by:  it is a sacred place of peace and prayer.  I especially encourage you to make your trip a holy pilgrimage.  Even if you live in the City, take some time to prayerfully journey to this Shrine to venerate the relics of St. Francis of Assisi, St. Clare, and St. Anthony of Padua.  Also, next to the Shrine is La Porziuncola Nuova, a replica of the original church that St. Francis himself rebuilt and where St. Clare made her vows.)


Day 3 of our novenaIte ad Ioseph (“Go to Joseph”, Genesis 41:55)

Countdown to St. Joseph’s Day:  9 days (begin novena today)
We are soon approaching the Solemnity of my co-patron, St. Joseph, Husband of Mary.  To prepare for this great celebration of my beloved guardian and father, here is a little reflection by the original Mother Teresa in her autobiography on perhaps her favorite saint (other than Our Lady, of course!).

"I took as my lord and advocate the glorious St. Joseph, commending myself earnestly to him, and I clearly saw that out of…troubles involving my honor and the salvation of my soul, this my lord and father delivered me, doing me greater benefits than I knew how to ask for.  
I do not remember to this day ever having asked him for anything that he did not grant me.  I am amazed at the great mercies which the Lord has done me through this blessed saint, and from what perils, both of body and soul, he has delivered me.  
The Lord seems to have given other saints grace to help in some troubles, but I know by experience that this glorious saint helps in all.  For His Majesty wishes to teach us that, as He was Himself subject to him on earth—for having the title of father, though only his guardian, St. Joseph could command him—so in heaven the Lord does what he asks.  This has also been the experience of some other persons whom I have told to commend themselves to him; and there are many more who have lately come to revere him, through having newly discovered that this is true…
I only beg for the love of God that anyone who does not believe me shall try for himself.  Then he will learn by experience what great good comes of recommending oneself to that glorious patriarch, and paying him service.
Persons who practice prayer, in particular, should always be his devotees.  I do not know how anyone can think of the Queen of the Angels, during the time when she suffered so much with the infant Jesus, without giving thanks to St. Joseph for the help he then gave them.  If anyone cannot find a master to teach him prayer, he should take this glorious saint for master, and he will not go astray on the road.  
May it please the Lord that I have not done wrong in venturing to speak of him.  For though I publicly profess my devotion to [St. Joseph], in serving him and imitating him I have always failed.  But he was true to his nature when he cured my paralysis, making it possible for me to rise and walk; and I was true to mine in making but poor use of this benefit.”

-  St. Teresa de Jesús (de Ávila)
Ite ad Ioseph (“Go to Joseph”, Genesis 41:55)

Countdown to St. Joseph’s Day:  9 days (begin novena today)

We are soon approaching the Solemnity of my co-patron, St. Joseph, Husband of Mary.  To prepare for this great celebration of my beloved guardian and father, here is a little reflection by the original Mother Teresa in her autobiography on perhaps her favorite saint (other than Our Lady, of course!).

"I took as my lord and advocate the glorious St. Joseph, commending myself earnestly to him, and I clearly saw that out of…troubles involving my honor and the salvation of my soul, this my lord and father delivered me, doing me greater benefits than I knew how to ask for. 

I do not remember to this day ever having asked him for anything that he did not grant me.  I am amazed at the great mercies which the Lord has done me through this blessed saint, and from what perils, both of body and soul, he has delivered me. 

The Lord seems to have given other saints grace to help in some troubles, but I know by experience that this glorious saint helps in all.  For His Majesty wishes to teach us that, as He was Himself subject to him on earth—for having the title of father, though only his guardian, St. Joseph could command him—so in heaven the Lord does what he asks.  This has also been the experience of some other persons whom I have told to commend themselves to him; and there are many more who have lately come to revere him, through having newly discovered that this is true…

I only beg for the love of God that anyone who does not believe me shall try for himself.  Then he will learn by experience what great good comes of recommending oneself to that glorious patriarch, and paying him service.

Persons who practice prayer, in particular, should always be his devotees.  I do not know how anyone can think of the Queen of the Angels, during the time when she suffered so much with the infant Jesus, without giving thanks to St. Joseph for the help he then gave them.  If anyone cannot find a master to teach him prayer, he should take this glorious saint for master, and he will not go astray on the road. 

May it please the Lord that I have not done wrong in venturing to speak of him.  For though I publicly profess my devotion to [St. Joseph], in serving him and imitating him I have always failed.  But he was true to his nature when he cured my paralysis, making it possible for me to rise and walk; and I was true to mine in making but poor use of this benefit.”

St. Teresa de Jesús (de Ávila)


Ite ad Ioseph (“Go to Joseph”, Genesis 41:55)

Since yesterday was the first Wednesday of St. Joseph’s month, here is a pic of our beloved Guardian and Father.  His feast day is March 19th, and I begin my annual novena (to my co-patron saint) this Saturday.  So, let me know if you have any prayer intentions that I can recommend to the most just heart of Joseph, on which the Infant Jesus would often rest His head.
In all necessities, Ite ad Ioseph (“Go to Joseph”, Genesis 41:55), for he is very kind and powerful.  I have no doubt that he who provided for the needs of Jesus and Mary will surely also give you his aid and protection.
(Photo from the Carmelite House of Prayer in Oakville, CA.  If you live near [or are visiting] the Napa Valley, stop by this beautiful Carmelite chapel and gardens.  And there’s usually a priest available to hear confessions.)

Since yesterday was the first Wednesday of St. Joseph’s month, here is a pic of our beloved Guardian and Father.  His feast day is March 19th, and I begin my annual novena (to my co-patron saint) this Saturday.  So, let me know if you have any prayer intentions that I can recommend to the most just heart of Joseph, on which the Infant Jesus would often rest His head.

In all necessities, Ite ad Ioseph (“Go to Joseph”, Genesis 41:55), for he is very kind and powerful.  I have no doubt that he who provided for the needs of Jesus and Mary will surely also give you his aid and protection.

(Photo from the Carmelite House of Prayer in Oakville, CA.  If you live near [or are visiting] the Napa Valley, stop by this beautiful Carmelite chapel and gardens.  And there’s usually a priest available to hear confessions.)