My reaction too!
From Catholic Memes

My reaction too!


From Catholic Memes

bebebhella:

Rome, Italy


So nice.

bebebhella:

Rome, Italy

So nice.

(via fidesandratio)

Album Art

KAMIANO ALOHA - Mele in honor of St. Damien of Moloka’i

By Puakea Nogelmeier & Robert M. Mondoy

No Beliuma ‘o Kamiano

Ka ‘elele mana’o’i’o

He aloha ‘euanelio

 

He kaua ke aloha

Pili i ko uka, pili i ko kai

Lawelawe mai ‘o a ‘o

 

Mau a mau ka pilina

I ka ‘aina, i ke kanaka

He pu’uwai la’ahia

 

He la’ana i ka pono

‘O Kamiano Aloha

Aloha mau loa e

 

He inoa no Kamiano Aloha

 

From Belgium came Damien

The faithful messenger

Revering the gospel of truth

 

A humble servant of mercy

For uplanders and shore folk

Serving throughout the land

 

With ties everlasting

To the land and its people

Truly a sacred heart

 

An emblem of sanctity

Beloved Damien

Love that has no bounds

 

A name chant for Beloved Damien

ArtistPuakea Nogelmeier & Robert M. Mondoy
TitleKamiano Aloha
St. Damien and St. Marianne of Moloka’i

E ka Makua o ke aloha nui, ma o
Kana Kamiano, ua ha’awi mai ‘oe i
ka ho’ike ma’amaÿama o ke aloha i
na mea ‘ilihune a ha’alele loa ‘ia.
E ‘ae mai ‘oe, me kona kokua a i
mau ho’ike mana’oi’o no kau Keiki,
‘o Iesu, e lilo pu makou i po’e kuene
no ia po’e ha’aha’a.
Noi makou i keia ma ka in
oa o kau Keiki Iesu Kristo,
e noho aupuni la me ‘oe a me ka ‘Uhane Hemolele i
Akua ho’okahi, mau a mau. ‘Amene
 

Father of mercy, in Saint Damien you have given us a shining witness of love for the poorest and most abandoned. Grant that, by his intercession, as faithful witnesses of your Son Jesus, we too may be servants of the most needy and rejected. We ask this through Christ, Your Son, who lives and reigns with You and the Holy Spirit, One God, for ever and ever. Amen.

St. Damien and St. Marianne of Moloka’i

E ka Makua o ke aloha nui, ma o

Kana Kamiano, ua ha’awi mai ‘oe i

ka ho’ike ma’amaÿama o ke aloha i

na mea ‘ilihune a ha’alele loa ‘ia.

E ‘ae mai ‘oe, me kona kokua a i

mau ho’ike mana’oi’o no kau Keiki,

‘o Iesu, e lilo pu makou i po’e kuene

no ia po’e ha’aha’a.

Noi makou i keia ma ka in

oa o kau Keiki Iesu Kristo,

e noho aupuni la me ‘oe a me ka ‘Uhane Hemolele i

Akua ho’okahi, mau a mau. ‘Amene

 

Father of mercy, in Saint Damien you have given us a shining witness of love for the poorest and most abandoned. Grant that, by his intercession, as faithful witnesses of your Son Jesus, we too may be servants of the most needy and rejected. We ask this through Christ, Your Son, who lives and reigns with You and the Holy Spirit, One God, for ever and ever. Amen.
E Kamiano, pray for us!
Today is the Feast of St. Damien of Moloka’i, a humble priest of the Fathers of the Sacred Hearts who left his native Belgium and sailed to Hawai’i as a missionary to spread the light of the Gospel. 
In Hawai’i in the 1800s, people who contracted leprosy were forced to leave their families and shipped to the Island of Moloka’i there to die in exile.  Fr. Damien was sent to Moloka’i to serve the lepers in Moloka’i; in administering the sacraments, Fr. Damien literally brought Jesus to a leper colony.
Aided towards the end of his life by St. Marianne Cope and her Sisters, Fr. Damien himself died of leprosy on April 15, 1889.  If he died in April, why then is his feast in May?  Since the date of his birth into everlasting life and total union with Christ often falls during Lent, the Bl. John Paul II at his beatification assigned him a liturgical memorial on May 10, the anniversary of his arrival in 1873 to Moloka’i, the island of death.  Thus is has been exactly 140 years since St. Damien first step foot on the island where he would live, work, and die in the service of the Lord.
Click here for more info about St. Damien the Leper of Moloka’i.

[Image:  Icon of St. Damien from the Studio of St. John the Baptist.]

E Kamiano, pray for us!

Today is the Feast of St. Damien of Moloka’i, a humble priest of the Fathers of the Sacred Hearts who left his native Belgium and sailed to Hawai’i as a missionary to spread the light of the Gospel.
 

In Hawai’i in the 1800s, people who contracted leprosy were forced to leave their families and shipped to the Island of Moloka’i there to die in exile.  Fr. Damien was sent to Moloka’i to serve the lepers in Moloka’i; in administering the sacraments, Fr. Damien literally brought Jesus to a leper colony.


Aided towards the end of his life by St. Marianne Cope and her Sisters, Fr. Damien himself died of leprosy on April 15, 1889.  If he died in April, why then is his feast in May?  Since the date of his birth into everlasting life and total union with Christ often falls during Lent, the Bl. John Paul II at his beatification assigned him a liturgical memorial on May 10, the anniversary of his arrival in 1873 to Moloka’i, the island of death.  Thus is has been exactly 140 years since St. Damien first step foot on the island where he would live, work, and die in the service of the Lord.


Click here for more info about St. Damien the Leper of Moloka’i.

[Image:  Icon of St. Damien from the Studio of St. John the Baptist.]

by-grace-of-god:

Basilica of Benedictine Abbey, Ottobeuren, Bavaria

(x)

(via closertothelost)

New batch of Swiss Guards take their Oath of Loyalty

Every year on the 6th of May, the Swiss Guards—the pope’s bodyguard—have their new recruits take an Oath of Fidelity.  This date also marks the anniversary of the Sack of Rome in which 147 Swiss Guards were slain on the steps of St. Peter’s Basilica while defending the Holy Father.

First, the chaplain of the Guards reads the oath:  “I swear I will faithfully, loyally and honourably serve the Supreme Pontiff Francis and his legitimate successors, and also dedicate myself to them with all my strength, sacrificing if necessary also my life to defend them. I assume this same commitment with regard to the Sacred College of Cardinals whenever the See is vacant.  Furthermore I promise to the Commanding Captain and my other superiors, respect, fidelity and obedience. This I swear! May God and our Holy Patrons assist me!

Then, the new recruits each come up, place one had on the flag of the Swiss Guards and raise the other hand showing 3 fingers as a sign of the Blessed Trinity say,

I, …, swear I will observe faithfully, loyally and honourably all that has now been read out to me! May God and his saints assist me! 

From a particularly moving homily this past Sunday.  The Dominicans aren’t called the Order of Preachers for nothing!

From a particularly moving homily this past Sunday. The Dominicans aren’t called the Order of Preachers for nothing!

THE TEKTON & THE APPRENTICE
As you know, I have a great devotion to St. Joseph.  He has been so good to me, and I am very blessed to have him as my patron and father.  It is a joy to spread devotion to the Guardian of the Redeemer and the most chaste spouse of Our Lady. 
In previous posts I have mentioned an amazing book that all spiritual sons and daughters of St. Joseph should own, The Life of St. Joseph by Sr. Maria Cecilia Baij, O.S.B. in which she recounts her private revelations of the hidden life of our beloved Patriarch and his relationship with Jesus and Mary in Bethlehem, Egypt, and Nazareth.
Here is how Sr. Maria Cecilia describes the Boy Jesus working along side his foster father whom the Gospels describe with the Greek word, tekton, a craftsman or person who works with his hands like a carpenter or masonry worker.

As soon as the Divine Youth grew up sufficiently to be able to render some assistance to Joseph, He sought of His own accord to go and help him in his work and to console him by His presence.  The happy Joseph never considered that Jesus actually wanted to humble Himself to such an extent as to perform this menial work, and when Jesus offered His willing assistance, the Saint was so deeply moved and declared he would never allow it unless the Heavenly Father Himself had actually ordained it.
Turning to Jesus he exclaimed:  “Oh, Eternal Wisdom, why do You wish to humiliate Yourself to such a degree?  How can I, Your servant, consent to see You devoting Yourself to such work as this, delicate as You are, and engaged as You are in continually treating with Your Heavenly Father concerning the vital business of man’s redemption?  How could I look on and see You being thus humiliated?”
The holy Youth set his mind at rest by declaring that this was the will of His Heavenly Father, and that in reality He Himself had come into the world not to be ministered unto, but rather to minister, wherefore, it was necessary that He should give an example of disdain for all ostentation and worldly esteem.  Joseph submitted to the will of the Heavenly Father and no longer made any objection.  Instead, he pondered over the joy that would be his by having his Jesus with him in the workshop.  He became exceedingly consoled, and proclaimed his unbounded happiness.  Turning to Mary, he expressed to Her his regret that She would, necessarily, be deprived of the loving presence of Jesus during those periods of time in which He would now be with him.  The Mother of God, being always conformed to the divine will and with a heart brimming with love, assured him that She was happy about the consolations that would be his, and that the divine will would be accomplished.
One can well imagine what spiritual joy the happy Joseph must have experienced, and how filled with consolation he must have been, as he took his beloved Jesus with him.  When he started to work it seemed to him as if he was in Paradise.  Was not the Son of God Himself there beside him, seeking to be of assistance to him?  Sometimes, the Boy Jesus would hand him tools, at other times pieces of lumber, even though He was only about five or six years old, He apparently wanted to carry on like a strong, grown-up man, as was indicated by the efforts he made to lift up the heavier boards.  The Saint was deeply touched by this and tried in every way possible to limit these exertions.  Besides all this, the Divine Youth was always so obliging that He even anticipated Joseph’s needs; and He performed everything in a most gracious spirit.

Oh, my friends, let us be like Jesus:  apprentices of Joseph, diligently performing our daily work under the guidance and close to the side of the holy Tekton of Nazareth!

[Image:  not mine.]

THE TEKTON & THE APPRENTICE

As you know, I have a great devotion to St. Joseph.  He has been so good to me, and I am very blessed to have him as my patron and father.  It is a joy to spread devotion to the Guardian of the Redeemer and the most chaste spouse of Our Lady. 

In previous posts I have mentioned an amazing book that all spiritual sons and daughters of St. Joseph should own, The Life of St. Joseph by Sr. Maria Cecilia Baij, O.S.B. in which she recounts her private revelations of the hidden life of our beloved Patriarch and his relationship with Jesus and Mary in Bethlehem, Egypt, and Nazareth.

Here is how Sr. Maria Cecilia describes the Boy Jesus working along side his foster father whom the Gospels describe with the Greek word, tekton, a craftsman or person who works with his hands like a carpenter or masonry worker.

As soon as the Divine Youth grew up sufficiently to be able to render some assistance to Joseph, He sought of His own accord to go and help him in his work and to console him by His presence.  The happy Joseph never considered that Jesus actually wanted to humble Himself to such an extent as to perform this menial work, and when Jesus offered His willing assistance, the Saint was so deeply moved and declared he would never allow it unless the Heavenly Father Himself had actually ordained it.

Turning to Jesus he exclaimed:  “Oh, Eternal Wisdom, why do You wish to humiliate Yourself to such a degree?  How can I, Your servant, consent to see You devoting Yourself to such work as this, delicate as You are, and engaged as You are in continually treating with Your Heavenly Father concerning the vital business of man’s redemption?  How could I look on and see You being thus humiliated?”

The holy Youth set his mind at rest by declaring that this was the will of His Heavenly Father, and that in reality He Himself had come into the world not to be ministered unto, but rather to minister, wherefore, it was necessary that He should give an example of disdain for all ostentation and worldly esteem.  Joseph submitted to the will of the Heavenly Father and no longer made any objection.  Instead, he pondered over the joy that would be his by having his Jesus with him in the workshop.  He became exceedingly consoled, and proclaimed his unbounded happiness.  Turning to Mary, he expressed to Her his regret that She would, necessarily, be deprived of the loving presence of Jesus during those periods of time in which He would now be with him.  The Mother of God, being always conformed to the divine will and with a heart brimming with love, assured him that She was happy about the consolations that would be his, and that the divine will would be accomplished.

One can well imagine what spiritual joy the happy Joseph must have experienced, and how filled with consolation he must have been, as he took his beloved Jesus with him.  When he started to work it seemed to him as if he was in Paradise.  Was not the Son of God Himself there beside him, seeking to be of assistance to him?  Sometimes, the Boy Jesus would hand him tools, at other times pieces of lumber, even though He was only about five or six years old, He apparently wanted to carry on like a strong, grown-up man, as was indicated by the efforts he made to lift up the heavier boards.  The Saint was deeply touched by this and tried in every way possible to limit these exertions.  Besides all this, the Divine Youth was always so obliging that He even anticipated Joseph’s needs; and He performed everything in a most gracious spirit.

Oh, my friends, let us be like Jesus:  apprentices of Joseph, diligently performing our daily work under the guidance and close to the side of the holy Tekton of Nazareth!

[Image:  not mine.]

Here is the Holy Father’s address (from Zenit.org) at this Wednesday’s General Audience on the Feast of St. Joseph the Work and the beginning of Mary’s Month with my emphasis.

Dear Brothers and Sisters,
Today, the 1st of May, we celebrate St. Joseph the Worker and begin the month traditionally dedicated to the Virgin Mary. During this encounter, I would thus like to reflect on these two important figures in the life of Jesus, of the Church and in our lives, with two brief thoughts: the first regarding work, the second on the contemplation of Jesus.
1. In the Gospel of St. Matthew, one of the times when Jesus returns to his native region, to Nazareth, and speaks in the synagogue, the Gospel underlines his fellow villagers’ astonishment at his wisdom, and the question they ask one another: is not this the Carpenter’s son?” (13:55). Jesus enters into our history, he comes into our midst, being born of Mary by the work of God, but with the presence of St. Joseph, the legal father who guards him and even teaches him his trade. Jesus was born and lived in a family, in the Holy Family, learning from St. Joseph the carpenter’s trade, in the workshop of Nazareth, sharing with him his commitment, hard work and satisfaction, as well as each day’s difficulties.
This calls to mind for us the dignity and importance of work. The Book of Genesis tells us that God created man and woman by entrusting to them the task of populating the Earth and subjugating it, which does not mean to exploit it, but to cultivate and guard it, to care for it with their own labour (cf. Gen 1:28; 2:15). The work is part of the plan of God’s love; we are called to cultivate and safeguard all the goods of creation and in this way we participate in the work of creation! The work is fundamental to the dignity of a person. Work, to use an image, “anoints” us with dignity, it fills us with dignity; it makes us similar to God, who has worked and works still, He is always acting (cf. Jn 5:17); it gives the ability to maintain oneself, one’s family, to contribute to the growth of one’s nation. And here I am thinking of the difficulties which, in different countries, today’s world of work and enterprise are facing; I think about how many people, and not just young people, are unemployed, often because of an economic conception of society, which seeks selfish gain, outside of the parameters of social justice.
I would like to invite everyone to solidarity, and wish to encourage those those in charge of public affairs to make every effort to give new impetus to employment; this means caring for the dignity of the person; but mostly I would say not to lose hope. St. Joseph also had difficult moments, but never lost confidence and was able to overcome them, in the certainty that God does not abandons us. And then I would like to address specifically the adolescents  and you young people: get involved in your daily duty, in study, in work, in friendships, in helping others; your future depends also on your wisdom in living these precious years of life. Don’t be afraid of effort, of sacrifice and don’t look to the future with fear; keep hope alive: there’s always a light on the horizon.
I add a word about another particular work situation that bothers me: I am referring to what could be defined as “slave labor”, work that enslaves. How many people, worldwide, are victims of this kind of slavery, where the person is at the service of work, when it must be work that offers a service to persons so that they may have dignity. I would ask my brothers and sisters in faith and all men and women of good will to make a decisive choice against the trafficking of persons, within which falls the category of “slave labor”.
2. The second thought: in the silence of his daily activity, St. Joseph shared with Mary a single, common focal point of attention: Jesus. They accompany and guard, with dedication and tenderness, the growth of the Son of God made man for us, reflecting on everything that happens. In the Gospels, Luke points out twice the attitude of Mary, which is also that of St. Joseph: “She treasured all these things, and pondered them in her heart” (2:19.51).
To listen to the Lord, we must learn to contemplate, to perceive His constant presence in our lives; we have to stop and talk to Him, give Him space with prayer. Every one of us, even you adolescent boys and girls, and young people, so numuerous here this morning, should ask yourselves: how much space do I give the Lord? Do I stop to dialogue with Him? Ever since we were little, our parents have accustomed us to begin and end the day with a prayer, to teach us to feel that the friendship and the love of God accompany us. Let us remember the Lord more often in our days!
And in this month of May, I would like to recall the importance and the beauty of the prayer of the Holy Rosary. Reciting the Hail Mary, we are led to contemplate the mysteries of Jesus, to reflect, that is, on the central moments of his life, so that, as for Mary and for St. Joseph, He may be the center of our thoughts, our attention and our actions. It would be nice if, especially in this month of May, you would pray together as a family, with your friends, in the parish, the Holy Rosary or some prayer to Jesus and the Virgin Mary! Praying together is a precious moment for making family life and friendship even more stable! Let us learn to pray more in the family and as a family!
Dear brothers and sisters, let us ask St. Joseph and the Virgin Mary to teach us to be faithful to our daily commitments, to live our faith in everyday actions and to give more space to the Lord in our lives, to stop to contemplate his face.
[Translation by Peter Waymel]
* * *
Speaker:
Dear Brothers and Sisters:
On this first day of May, Mary’s month, we celebrate the feast of Saint Joseph the Worker. Joseph, the carpenter of Nazareth, reminds us of the dignity and importance of labour. Work is part of God’s plan for the world; by responsibly cultivating the goods of creation, we grow in dignity as men and women made in God’s image. For this reason, the problem of unemployment urgently demands greater social solidarity and wise and just policies. I also encourage the many young people present to look to the future with hope, and to invest themselves fully in their studies, their work and their relationships with others. Saint Joseph, as a model of quiet prayer and closeness to Jesus, also invites us to think about the time we devote to prayer each day. In this month of May, the Rosary naturally comes to mind as a way to contemplate the mysteries of Christ’s life. May Saint Joseph and the Virgin Mary help us to be faithful in our daily work and to lift up our minds and hearts to Jesus in prayer.


[Image:  not mine]

Here is the Holy Father’s address (from Zenit.org) at this Wednesday’s General Audience on the Feast of St. Joseph the Work and the beginning of Mary’s Month with my emphasis.

Dear Brothers and Sisters,

Today, the 1st of May, we celebrate St. Joseph the Worker and begin the month traditionally dedicated to the Virgin Mary. During this encounter, I would thus like to reflect on these two important figures in the life of Jesus, of the Church and in our lives, with two brief thoughts: the first regarding work, the second on the contemplation of Jesus.

1. In the Gospel of St. Matthew, one of the times when Jesus returns to his native region, to Nazareth, and speaks in the synagogue, the Gospel underlines his fellow villagers’ astonishment at his wisdom, and the question they ask one another: is not this the Carpenter’s son?” (13:55). Jesus enters into our history, he comes into our midst, being born of Mary by the work of God, but with the presence of St. Joseph, the legal father who guards him and even teaches him his trade. Jesus was born and lived in a family, in the Holy Family, learning from St. Joseph the carpenter’s trade, in the workshop of Nazareth, sharing with him his commitment, hard work and satisfaction, as well as each day’s difficulties.

This calls to mind for us the dignity and importance of work. The Book of Genesis tells us that God created man and woman by entrusting to them the task of populating the Earth and subjugating it, which does not mean to exploit it, but to cultivate and guard it, to care for it with their own labour (cf. Gen 1:28; 2:15). The work is part of the plan of God’s love; we are called to cultivate and safeguard all the goods of creation and in this way we participate in the work of creation! The work is fundamental to the dignity of a person. Work, to use an image, “anoints” us with dignity, it fills us with dignity; it makes us similar to God, who has worked and works still, He is always acting (cf. Jn 5:17); it gives the ability to maintain oneself, one’s family, to contribute to the growth of one’s nation. And here I am thinking of the difficulties which, in different countries, today’s world of work and enterprise are facing; I think about how many people, and not just young people, are unemployed, often because of an economic conception of society, which seeks selfish gain, outside of the parameters of social justice.

I would like to invite everyone to solidarity, and wish to encourage those those in charge of public affairs to make every effort to give new impetus to employment; this means caring for the dignity of the person; but mostly I would say not to lose hope. St. Joseph also had difficult moments, but never lost confidence and was able to overcome them, in the certainty that God does not abandons us. And then I would like to address specifically the adolescents  and you young people: get involved in your daily duty, in study, in work, in friendships, in helping others; your future depends also on your wisdom in living these precious years of life. Don’t be afraid of effort, of sacrifice and don’t look to the future with fear; keep hope alive: there’s always a light on the horizon.

I add a word about another particular work situation that bothers me: I am referring to what could be defined as “slave labor”, work that enslaves. How many people, worldwide, are victims of this kind of slavery, where the person is at the service of work, when it must be work that offers a service to persons so that they may have dignity. I would ask my brothers and sisters in faith and all men and women of good will to make a decisive choice against the trafficking of persons, within which falls the category of “slave labor”.

2. The second thought: in the silence of his daily activity, St. Joseph shared with Mary a single, common focal point of attention: Jesus. They accompany and guard, with dedication and tenderness, the growth of the Son of God made man for us, reflecting on everything that happens. In the Gospels, Luke points out twice the attitude of Mary, which is also that of St. Joseph: “She treasured all these things, and pondered them in her heart” (2:19.51).

To listen to the Lord, we must learn to contemplate, to perceive His constant presence in our lives; we have to stop and talk to Him, give Him space with prayer. Every one of us, even you adolescent boys and girls, and young people, so numuerous here this morning, should ask yourselves: how much space do I give the Lord? Do I stop to dialogue with Him? Ever since we were little, our parents have accustomed us to begin and end the day with a prayer, to teach us to feel that the friendship and the love of God accompany us. Let us remember the Lord more often in our days!

And in this month of May, I would like to recall the importance and the beauty of the prayer of the Holy Rosary. Reciting the Hail Mary, we are led to contemplate the mysteries of Jesus, to reflect, that is, on the central moments of his life, so that, as for Mary and for St. Joseph, He may be the center of our thoughts, our attention and our actions. It would be nice if, especially in this month of May, you would pray together as a family, with your friends, in the parish, the Holy Rosary or some prayer to Jesus and the Virgin Mary! Praying together is a precious moment for making family life and friendship even more stable! Let us learn to pray more in the family and as a family!

Dear brothers and sisters, let us ask St. Joseph and the Virgin Mary to teach us to be faithful to our daily commitments, to live our faith in everyday actions and to give more space to the Lord in our lives, to stop to contemplate his face.

[Translation by Peter Waymel]

* * *

Speaker:

Dear Brothers and Sisters:

On this first day of May, Mary’s month, we celebrate the feast of Saint Joseph the Worker. Joseph, the carpenter of Nazareth, reminds us of the dignity and importance of labour. Work is part of God’s plan for the world; by responsibly cultivating the goods of creation, we grow in dignity as men and women made in God’s image. For this reason, the problem of unemployment urgently demands greater social solidarity and wise and just policies. I also encourage the many young people present to look to the future with hope, and to invest themselves fully in their studies, their work and their relationships with others. Saint Joseph, as a model of quiet prayer and closeness to Jesus, also invites us to think about the time we devote to prayer each day. In this month of May, the Rosary naturally comes to mind as a way to contemplate the mysteries of Christ’s life. May Saint Joseph and the Virgin Mary help us to be faithful in our daily work and to lift up our minds and hearts to Jesus in prayer.

[Image:  not mine]

That’s it, folks!  This is my last post (at least for a while).  May Our Most Holy Mother always shield you under her mantle.
A hui hou!
[Picture:  Painting by James Langley for the FSSP Our Lady of Guadalupe Seminary Chapel.]

That’s it, folks!  This is my last post (at least for a while).  May Our Most Holy Mother always shield you under her mantle.

A hui hou!

[Picture:  Painting by James Langley for the FSSP Our Lady of Guadalupe Seminary Chapel.]

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